Aestheticism and spiritualism: A narrative study of the exploration of self through the practice of Chinese calligraphy

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Abstract

Calligraphy has been used to preserve significant writings and texts in a beautiful form and to make the different styles of writing enjoyable. It is not only the art of beautiful handwriting but also a cultural heritage and tradition that reflects the culture and history of a society, a race, a nation, and a country. Hence, it has very great educational value. In China calligraphy is done with a brush, which was a common writing implement in ancient times. In addition to its utilitarian function, calligraphy is the most fundamental element in other types of art, such as painting and seal-carving, and is closely connected to many subject disciplines, such as literature, history, and philosophy. Brush calligraphy is still popular in Chinese society and is frequently used in different forms of publication, such as banners and newspapers; however, it is becoming more popular for these publications to be created mechanically or in electronic form with computers rather than by hand. In the context of schooling, a similar phenomenon can be seen. Many teachers in Hong Kong, as elsewhere, are concerned that fewer and fewer students have the chance to write with a pen and enjoy the beauty of writing, as the use of computers and different types of electronic devices for writing become more popular with the general public. Copyright © 2010 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-30
JournalThe Journal of Aesthetic Education
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Spiritualism
Chinese Calligraphy
Aestheticism
Calligraphy
Art
History
Hong Kong
Trustees
Carvings
Seal
Philosophy
Schooling
Illinois
China
Handwriting
Education
Cultural Heritage
Cultural Tradition
Banner
Fundamental

Citation

Hue, M.-T. (2010). Aestheticism and spiritualism: A narrative study of the exploration of self through the practice of Chinese calligraphy. The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 44(2), 18-30.