Activity theory approach to developing teacher curriculum leadership: Hong Kong Chinese perspectives

Hau Fai Edmond LAW

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper will report on the mediation effects of the key artifacts upon teacher participation in two school-based leadership development projects in schools in 2005 and 2006 respectively. This structural approach to taking up more curriculum responsibilities by the schools in Hong Kong was recommended by the Government in 2001, and yet there is little empirical evidence about its implementation and effectiveness. The projects will collaborate with two active schools, setting up two curriculum development teams in each to bring about planned innovations in pedagogy. The teams will conduct a cycle of curriculum activities in the first and second semesters, reviewing the current curriculum, planning an innovation, and designing and implementing it in classroom settings. Afterwards, each team will conduct reflection for further improvement. All participating teachers will be interviewed 4 times during participation. All meetings and tryout lessons will be video-taped. The interview data will be analyzed by identifying and classifying key emerging themes which will illuminate our understanding of the participating teachers' experiences in the curriculum process. The meeting data will be analyzed using activity theory to identify the key factors that facilitate or constrain the effectiveness of the teacher participation. The findings will deepen our understanding of the effectiveness of teacher participation in school-based curriculum development.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Hong Kong
leadership
curriculum
teacher
participation
school
curriculum development
innovation
curriculum planning
development project
mediation
semester
artifact
video
classroom
responsibility
interview
evidence
experience

Citation

Law, H.-F. E. (2007, May). Activity theory approach to developing teacher curriculum leadership: Hong Kong Chinese perspectives. Paper presented at Redesigning Pedagogy International Conference: Culture, Knowledge and Understanding, Singapore.

Keywords

  • School change and leadership
  • Curriculum theory