Academic self-concept and learning strategies: Direction of effect on student academic achievement

Dennis Michael MCINERNEY, Magdalena Mo Ching MOK, Wing Yi Rebecca CHENG, Kwok Hap Amy LAM

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

This study examines the effects of academic self-concept and learning strategies and their direction of effect in predicting academic achievement of 8,354 students from 16 secondary schools in Hong Kong. ASDQ and the LPQ are utilized. Two competing models are tested to ascertain the direction of effect. SEM suggests that depicting learning strategies as predictors mediated through academic self-concept is more heuristic. This model indicates that deep strategies has fully mediated effects on English achievement through English self-concept and partially mediated effects on mathematics achievement through both deep and surface learning. Surface learning has a partially (negative) mediated effect on English achievement through English self-concept and a partially (negative) mediated effect on mathematics achievement through both English and mathematics self-concept.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Citation

McInerney, D. M., Mok, M. M. C., Cheng, R. W., & Lam, A. K. H. (2011, April). Academic self-concept and learning strategies: Direction of effect on student academic achievement. Paper presented at the (American Educational Research Association) AERA 2011 Annual Meeting: Inciting the social imagination: Education research for the public good, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana.

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