Academic motivation, self-concept, engagement, and performance in high school: Key processes from a longitudinal perspective

Jasmine GREEN, Gregory Arief D. LIEM, Andrew J. MARTIN, Susan COLMAR, Herbert W. MARSH, Dennis Michael MCINERNEY

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103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study tested three theoretically/conceptually hypothesized longitudinal models of academic processes leading to academic performance. Based on a longitudinal sample of 1866 high-school students across two consecutive years of high school (Time 1 and Time 2), the model with the most superior heuristic value demonstrated: (a) academic motivation and self-concept positively predicted attitudes toward school; (b) attitudes toward school positively predicted class participation and homework completion and negatively predicted absenteeism; and (c) class participation and homework completion positively predicted test performance whilst absenteeism negatively predicted test performance. Taken together, these findings provide support for the relevance of the self-system model and, particularly, the importance of examining the dynamic relationships amongst engagement factors of the model. The study highlights implications for educational and psychological theory, measurement, and intervention. Copyright © 2012 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1111-1122
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

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Self Concept
Motivation
Absenteeism
Psychological Theory
Students

Citation

Green, J., Liem, G. A. D., Martin, A. J., Colmar, S., Marsh, H. W., & McInerney, D. (2012). Academic motivation, self-concept, engagement, and performance in high school: Key processes from a longitudinal perspective. Journal of Adolescence, 35(5), 1111-1122.

Keywords

  • Motivation
  • Self-concept
  • Engagement
  • Performance
  • Structural equation modeling