A study of the predictive effect of pre-service teacher personal knowledge management competency on their instructional design skills

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Abstract

This paper aims to examine the relationship between the personal knowledge management (PKM) competency of pre-service teachers and their instructional design skills. Supporting the sustainable development of teachers as professionals in the knowledge society is a critical issue in teacher education. This study attempts to identify an empirical model and a curriculum framework for nurturing pre-service teachers’ PKM competency. Dorsey (2000) PKM skills were adopted for constructing the theoretical framework and the survey instrument. A quasi-experimental research design was used to collect data from pre-service teachers from Hong Kong’s largest teacher education institution. A structural equation model was applied to explore the predictive power of PKM competency on their instructional design. Results show that a four-factor PKM competency model, which consists of retrieving, analyzing, organizing and collaborative skills, was identified as a predictor of instructional design. Use of PKM tools, e-learning activities and collaborative action research for developing pre-service teacher PKM competency are recommended to teaching education institute. Copyright © 2011 TLA, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Knowledge Management Practice
Volume12
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

Citation

Cheng, E. (2011). A study of the predictive effect of pre-service teacher personal knowledge management competency on their instructional design skills. Journal of Knowledge Management Practice, 12(3). Retrieved June 21, 2016, from http://www.tlainc.com/articl271.htm

Keywords

  • Personal knowledge management
  • Pre-service teacher
  • Teacher education

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