A structural equation modeling approach to examining factors influencing outcomes with cochlear implant in Mandarin-speaking children

Yuan CHEN, Lena L. N. WONG, Shufeng ZHU, Xin XI

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective
To examine the direct and indirect effects of demographical factors on speech perception and vocabulary outcomes of Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs).

Methods
115 participants implanted before the age of 5 and who had used CI before 1 to 3 years were evaluated using a battery of speech perception and vocabulary tests. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses proposed.

Results
Early implantation significantly contributed to speech perception outcomes while having undergone a hearing aid trial (HAT) before implantation, maternal educational level (MEL), and having undergone universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) before implantation had indirect effects on speech perception outcomes via their effects on age at implantation. In addition, both age at implantation and MEL had direct and indirect effects on vocabulary skills, while UNHS and HAT had indirect effects on vocabulary outcomes via their effects on age at implantation.

Conclusion
A number of factors had indirect and direct effects on speech perception and vocabulary outcomes in Mandarin-speaking children with CIs and these factors were not necessarily identical to those reported among their English-speaking counterparts. Copyright © 2015 Chen et al. 
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0136576
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Citation

Chen, Y., Wong, L. L. N., Zhu, S., & Xi, X. (2015). A structural equation modeling approach to examining factors influencing outcomes with cochlear implant in Mandarin-speaking children. PLoS One, 10(9). Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0136576

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