A search for new ways of describing parent-child relationships: Voices from principals, teachers, guidance professional, parents and pupils

Yuk Yee Pattie LUK-FONG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

What are children’s perceptions and experience of parent-child relationships in Hong Kong, where westernization (modernization) has met with the indigenous Chinese culture? This article focuses on how school children in Hong Kong are constantly grappling with ‘Chinese’ and ‘western’ traditions in the parent-child relationship as they hear different voices from school guidance professionals, school principals, teachers and parents in an already hybridized society at large. Findings suggest that school stakeholders hold different views about the parent-child relationship and that parents are the most ambivalent about their parental role, being caught between the traditional idea of authority and submission, and the modern idea of equality. Furthermore, discrepancies between belief and behaviour are causing tensions for all stakeholders. The findings have theoretical as well as practical implications in teacher training, parent education and guidance programmes for primary school children. Copyright © 2005 Sage Publications.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-137
JournalChildhood
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

Fingerprint

Parent-Child Relations
Pupil
Parents
Hong Kong
Social Change
Education

Citation

Luk-Fong, Y. Y. P. (2005). A search for new ways of describing parent-child relationships: Voices from principals, teachers, guidance professional, parents and pupils. Childhood, 12(1), 111-137.

Keywords

  • Globalization
  • Hybridity
  • Parent-child relationship