A longitudinal study of children's voices in regard to stress and coping during the transition to school

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Abstract

This study explores (1) how parental and teacher scaffolding and children's coping strategies contribute to children's adjustment during the transition from preschool to school; and (2) how children's perception of stress and coping are constructed over time. The sample included 216 six-year-old children, their parents and teachers. The parents, teachers and children reported that many children encountered social stress and being incompetent at school, and most of the children used either direct problem-solving or seeking social support to cope with stress, but had not used emotion-focused coping strategies learnt at preschool. Compared with the parents’ and teachers’ responses, the children reported more incidences of social stress. Compared with the children's responses, more parents and teachers reported children being incompetent in learning or self-help skills at school. Implications of the study were discussed at the end of the article. Copyright © 2015 Taylor & Francis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)927-946
JournalEarly Child Development and Care
Volume186
Issue number6
Early online dateAug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Longitudinal Studies
Parents
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Emotions
Learning
Incidence

Citation

Wong, M. (2016). A longitudinal study of children's voices in regard to stress and coping during the transition to school. Early Child Development and Care, 186(6), 927-946.

Keywords

  • Coping with stress
  • Transition to school
  • Children's voices
  • Parental strategies
  • Teacher's strategies