A fixed mindset leads to negative affect: The relations between implicit theories of intelligence and subjective well-being

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The way individuals think about their intelligence (i.e., implicit theories of intelligence) powerfully shapes learning processes. However, not much is known about how implicit theories of intelligence are associated with subjective well-being. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between implicit theories of intelligence and subjective well-being as indexed by life satisfaction, positive affect, and (low levels of) negative affect. Study 1, a cross-sectional study, showed that entity theory of intelligence was negatively associated with life satisfaction and positively associated with negative affect. Study 2, a cross-lagged longitudinal study, showed that implicit theories and certain dimensions of subjective well-being were reciprocally related. Time 1 entity theory positively predicted subsequent negative affect, while Time 1 positive affect was negatively associated with T2 entity theory. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Hogrefe Publishing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-145
JournalZeitschrift fur Psychologie
Volume225
Issue number2
Early online dateJul 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017

Citation

King, R. B. (2017). A fixed mindset leads to negative affect: The relations between implicit theories of intelligence and subjective well-being. Zeitschrift fur Psychologie, 225(2), 137-145.

Keywords

  • Implicit theories of intelligence
  • Subjective well-being
  • Entity theory

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